Vitamin D and Calcium Pills Do Not Prevent Bone Fractures.txt
Vitamin D and Calcium Pills Do Not Prevent Bone Fractures

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) says there is no 
value for postmenopausal women to take pills containing up to 400 
IU of vitamin D and 1,000 mg of calcium because they do not help 
prevent bone fractures in older women (June 12, 2012). Fifty percent 
of postmenopausal women will suffer bone fracture after menopause. 
Higher doses of calcium and vitamin D may help to prevent bone 
fractures, but we have no good data to support their use now. No 
data show that vitamin D pills at any dose, with or without calcium, 
prevent cancer. We do have data to show that vitamin D pills, at 
600 to 800 IU/day, help to prevent falls in older people.

However, doses at or below 400 IU of vitamin D and 1,000 mg of 
calcium increase the risk of kidney stones, and excess calcium is 
associated with increased risk of heart attacks. Therefore, the 
USPSTF states that "with no evidence of benefit, there is no reason 
to risk harm."