exercise prevents and treats prostate cancer
Exercise Prevents and Treats Prostate Cancer

Among a group of 164 white men having prostate biopsies 
to look for cancer, those who exercised regularly were less 
likely to have prostate cancer and less likely to have the high-
grade type of prostate cancer that can kill (Cancer, published 
online Feb 11, 2013). Among 143 African Americans, exercise was 
not associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, or with risk 
of high-grade disease.
  
EXERCISE CAUSES BLOOD FACTORS THAT INHIBIT PROSTATE CANCER:
Twelve years ago, researchers at UCLA showed that men who 
exercised and ate a low-fat, high-fiber diet had factors in their 
bloodstream that markedly reduced  the growth of LNCaP prostate 
cancer cells in a test tube (The Journal of Urology. Sept, 
2001;166(3):1185-1189).  The blood of obese, non-exercising men 
promoted the growth of these cancer cells. After eleven days of 
exercising and eating a low fat, high-fiber diet, their blood 
inhibited the growth of these prostate cancer cells.  The blood 
of long-term exercisers reduced growth of prostate cancer cells 
even more.

A REVIEW OF STUDIES ON EXERCISE AND PROSTATE CANCER:        
Between 1976 and 2002, 27 studies appeared in medical journals on 
the association between exercise and prostate cancer (Sports 
Medicine, 2004;34(6):363-369). Sixteen showed an association 
between exercise and decreased prostate cancer risk. The average 
risk reduction ranged from 10-30 percent. Exercise lowers certain 
hormones, prevents obesity, enhances immune function and reduces 
oxidative stress; all of these help to protect against cancer.
 
INTENSE EXERCISE REDUCES PROSTATE CANCER EVEN MORE:          
Researchers from the Health Professional Follow-Up Study followed 
2,705 males with prostate cancer over a period of 18 years 
(Journal of Clinical Oncology, January 4, 2011). They found that 
regular exercise improves survival from prostate cancer. Those 
who walked at least 90 minutes per week briskly were 46 percent 
less likely to die from any cause compared to men who walked less 
than 90 minutes per week at a slow pace.

Those who exercised more intensely were far less likely 
to die from prostate cancer.  They defined intense exercise as at 
least three hours of intensive exercise each week.  Prostate 
cancer patients who exercised intensely had a 61 percent lower 
chance of dying from prostate cancer compared to those who only 
did one hour or less of easy exercise per week.